Rochester’s First Churches

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July 30, 2014 by rochesterhistoricalnh

 

Part One – The 1700’s

For many years, men had been cutting lumber and mast trees north of Dover and these workmen were familiar with the area.  About 100 years after Dover was first settled, it was decided that it was time to create a new town.

By the 1720’s land for a new town north of Dover was divided up into lots of 60 acres owned by proprietors.  Most of these men were investors and usually did not move here.  The first attempt to get people to come here to settle failed because of conflicts with the native people and fears about moving into this wilderness.[i]

By 1730 a second attempt was made and several families came to settle the new town.  One of the first acts of the proprietors was to vote to build a meetinghouse. Their vote was for a building, “forty feet long, thirty-five feet wide, and eighteen foot stud; to be well framed & Inclosed &c.”  [ii]

This meeting house was built on the top of Rochester Hill.  The spot was near the middle of the town as it was then laid out.  Its position at the top of the highest point was good for safety.  The roads all led to this spot. The building would be the center of the town government and also serve as the church. Most of the early Rochester settlers attended this meeting house which was called Congregational because the people of the congregation made the decisions.

The people gathered at the meetinghouse to make town government decisions as well as for religious activities.  There was no separation of church and state.  Everyone was taxed to support the Congregational meetinghouse ministry.

Many of Rochester’s first settlers were descendants of Puritan churches , and they followed the teachings of John Calvin.   They subscribed to Calvin’s doctrines of predestination and the strict moral codes of their Puritan forefathers.  They loved and feared their Lord, and they believed that their salvation was entirely in His hands.

At this time minsters were well -educated men, graduates of Harvard or Dartmouth and among the most educated people in the community.  Rochester settlers wished to have such a person for their spiritual guidance.   Ministers from Dover did visit the new town from time to time, but the people wanted someone of their own to rely on.

The land owning proprietors who mostly lived elsewhere were slow to hire a minister and the residents had to petition them for one.  Their second petition in 1736/7 read in part, “Your petitioners have been settled here, some of them seven years or thereabout…we are now increased to the number of about 60 families and are as yet destitute of a settled minister.” [iii]

In May of 1737, Parson Amos Main was called to full time service.   He was a Harvard graduate and his wife was also very well educated.  She had attended the best schools available for women in Boston.   The parson carried out his religious duties and helped with governmental responsibilities. [iv]

He acted as a lawyer and as a doctor for the people.  The journals he kept show that he traveled to many area towns.  He recorded charges for treating people in Berwick, Durham, Barrington, Lebanon, Somersworth, Dover and occasionally Greenland, Rye, Stratham, and Wells.  While on these journeys he provided spiritual support, met with people on their deathbed, and baptized infants and adults.  He dispensed medicines and set broken bones.

He also acted as a lawyer, writing wills and indentures.  He was paid for his services with whatever the person could give him such as wool, flax, boards, beef, pork, or labor.  Rarely, he received money. Money was scarce and people were more likely to trade goods and services than to use money. [v]

Parson Main and the early Rochester settlers lived in a time of great danger from the French and Indian Wars. During this time, some Rochester residents were captured and taken to Canada and others were killed. Parson Main is remembered as always carrying his gun wherever he went, but he never had to use it for defense.  The native people had great respect for him.  They frequently came to his house to visit and would tell him details that they knew about his travels like where he had been and even when they had seen him walk his horse or when he had trotted it.  When asked why they had not killed him, they said it was because he was a good man, like their priests they knew in St Francis, Canada. [vi] Amos Main lived in his own private house until his death of consumption in 1760.

The next minister, Samuel Hill, had a house built for him by the town at the top of the hill across from the meetinghouse.  The townspeople continued to be blessed by many good ministers over the years.

Perhaps the second best known of them was Rev. Joseph Haven who served for 49 years. After living so long in the parsonage at the top of Rochester Hill, the hill became known as Haven’s hill; and his name still appears in Sky Haven Airport and Haven Hill Road. One of his accomplishments was getting a new meetinghouse.  From one of his sermons we learn of the condition of the old meetinghouse.  He said, “[It] is a mark of declension in religion to see God’s house going to ruin.  .. this old rack of a building is going to decay without any repairs and which by our conduct we seem to think good enough to worship God…Do you think that if you have convenient houses yourselves to dwell in that it is no matter how God is turned off?  Why should there be such neglect?  Why do you show such little regard to God and religion?” [vii]

By this time many of the early settlers’ dwellings had been replaced by nicer homes and it was time to upgrade the meetinghouse as well.  A new one was built in 1780 on the Commons which was now nearer the center of the growing town. Eleven hundred fifty-seven days of labor were recorded for getting out and raising the frame of this building. For the raising, the committee bought 34 gallons of rum, 11 pounds of sugar, 1 barrel of cider, 2 ½ bushels of meal, 38 pounds of salt pork, 168 pounds of veal, 1 bushel of peas, 1 peck of beans, 9 pounds of butter and two bushels of potatoes. [viii]

This building remained on the Commons for the next 63 years until it was moved to its current location in what had become the center of the village.

 

 

In his 49 years the Rev. Haven saw many changes taking place in religion which were of great concern to him and his sermons reflected this.  He spoke of the dangers of spirituality, warning his congregation of what he saw as the danger of being influenced by the Quakers.  Later he would become alarmed by the rise of other groups coming into the area.[ix]

While the majority of the first settlers had been Congregationalists, there were also some Quakers or Friends.  There was a significant number in the southeastern corner of the town which later became known as Walnut Grove.  They attempted to go to their meetings at their Dover meetinghouse, but this was difficult and in 1743 they asked for permission to hold their monthly meetings in the home of Ephraim Tebbets.  Ephraim lived on the lot where the Egwanulti Farm, last operated by H.E. Fowler and Sons, now stands. [x]There was also a group of Friends in the Gonic area and later in Meaderboro .

About the same time as the meetinghouse was moved to the Commons, several Rochester Friends formed a committee to build their own meetinghouse. In 1781, this meetinghouse was built near the present Somersworth line on Route 16B. Later it was moved to Gonic. [xi]

Later in the 1700’s, the Friends and others who were not as connected to the Calvinist faith, began to question the system of taxation which required that everyone support the town church.  In 1791 the town began separating the taxes into town taxes and parish taxes, and Friends did not pay parish taxes.

As Rev. Haven foresaw, other groups were beginning to have influence in the community. The efforts to separate church and state continued as more people began to join other sects, especially the Methodists and the Baptists in the early 1800’s.  In 1819 church and state were legally separated for the first time in New Hampshire. [xii]

Part two – New Views  Beginning with the period often called “The First Great Awakening” in the 1700’s preachers began putting more emphasis on man having responsibility for his own salvation.   Some Congregationalists were starting to move away from strict Calvinism.  They were known as “New Lights”.

Ministers traveled the countryside spreading the gospel message that people needed to choose how they would relate to their God.  One of these men was the most famous traveling minister of his time, George Whitefield.  George Whitefield traveled thousands of miles throughout the colonies and Europe spreading his message. He preached over 15,000 sermons in his booming theatrical voice.  He attracted crowds of thousands, an amazing feat before the days of media advertising.[xiii]

It is believed that he came to Rochester on his many travels throughout New England and preached from a rock on Rochester Hill across the street from the Rev. Joseph Haven’s home.

 

One of the new groups to come out of the influence of George Whitefield and others was the Methodists.  After first meeting in a home on Rochester Hill, they built their first meeting house in Rochester in 1824. It was 42×55 feet and “a plain and decent style”.  This building remained for 43 years until the current building was built in the same location in 1867. [xiv]

Another new group was the Universalists who began gathering in Rochester in 1841.  Most  of the time they had difficulty  securing their own minister.  Sometimes they shared with Dover, meeting in the afternoons to allow time for him to get to Rochester.  In the later 1800’s they met in Mc Duffee Hall. [xv]

Other people began to become interested in the ideas preached by William Miller.  Likely influenced by the new emphasis on science and the scientific method, Miller believed he had figured out the date of Christ’s advent or return to earth.  He and others traveled around the area armed with charts and graphs proving their theory. [xvi]

While his predictions were inaccurate, he had many followers.  By the 1860’s, two of these groups had national recognition and would eventually build churches in Rochester.  They were the Advent Christians and the Seventh Day Adventists.

There were also traveling Baptist preachers who became well known for their evangelizing.  One of these well-known men who traveled all over New England and who came to Rochester, was John Colby. [xvii] Another area preacher, Benjamin Randal, is still known as “The Father of the Free-will Baptist Movement in the North”.

In the 1770’s  Benjamin Randal  started his travels all over this area spreading the gospel that people are free to choose to believe and that they must make a personal decision to accept salvation.  His preaching attracted crowds wherever he went.

Eventually he moved to New Durham where he and a few other people started the First Freewill Baptist church in the north.  He was greatly loved and admired and many were influenced by his teachings.  [xviii]

The Rev. Enoch Place was born in Rochester.  He was one of many of Randal’s admirers.  Rev. Place kept journals and often talked of Randal’s influence on his life.

He wrote of going to the Hanson home on the corner of Haven Hill Road and Route108.  He remembered being in this home that he called a  “Pilgrim’s Inn” forty years earlier when he wrote, “there the pious Randal found a place of rest and for preaching.  There the devoted Colby preached the gospel and there I heard     him…”[xix]  Before the advent of modern entertainment, people would go to see any speakers who came to the area.  Many of them went to hear the well- known preachers, John Colby and Benjamin Randal, speak when they were at the Hansons’ home in the early 1800’s.

 

Converts from these revivals first met for worship and preaching in Quarterly Meetings. These meetings which were held  once every three months, were large conferences where a number of ministers from all over the area would get together and hold meetings and services for two or three days. People would come from miles around to hear sermons. The people would stay overnight in homes, often sleeping on the floor or even in barns to be able to attend these conferences.  They went to hear the speakers, and they also enjoyed the chance to see old friends and relatives. Rev. Place tells of the many quarterly meetings he went to in his over 50 years in the ministry.  Most often they were held in Benjamin Randal’s hometown of New Durham, but many other towns occasionally hosted the meetings.  Some quarterly meetings had attendance measured in the thousands.

Quarterly meetings were often held in the Rochester Court House.  Enoch Place and Elder Edward Blaisdell were often speakers at the Rochester Court House. [xx]

In addition to the quarterly meetings there were also monthly meetings.  These monthly neighborhood gatherings were usually held in people’s homes.  In the first half of the 1800’s many groups of believers did not have their own settled minister.  They relied on these quarterly and monthly meetings for their religious instruction.

Many of the ministers in the 1800’s, like Enoch Place, traveled much of the time on horseback or by wagon from town to town visiting people and carrying their message.

A large following of free-will preaching was developing with monthly meetings in the Gonic area. There were enough followers in the Gonic area of Rochester to form a church on April 15, 1829. The house for the First Freewill Baptist Church of Rochester was built in Gonic in 1840. [xxi]

Part Three – Walnut Grove, one example of how 19th century churches grew

There are references to the Walnut Grove community early in Enoch Place’s journals.    On March 16, 1818, he says, “ I preached by particular Request at the house of Colonel Joshua Allen in Rochester.” [xxii]  “The Colonel was very ill but gave good attention to the things spoken, as did many others …”  [xxiii]   The colonel lived on what is known as “the old Salmon Falls Road” off the current Bernard Road.

In April Rev. Place writes, “ we had a very exelent meeting at Col J.[oshua] Allen’s in Rochester.”  A couple of months later he tells of attending the Colonel’s funeral where Rev. Joseph Haven, the Congregational minister, conducted the service.

On Sunday, the 6th of September, he returned to the home of Col. Allen’s widow on the Old Salmon Falls Road. “This was the solemnest and best meeting I ever saw in this place…”  [xxiv]

The people in the Walnut Grove neighborhood were listening to the itinerant preachers and holding monthly home meetings while also staying involved with their Congregational meetinghouse early in the 1800’s.

 

Later, it seems that the people of Walnut Grove were also influenced by the preaching across the river in nearby Lebanon, Maine.  When Rev. Enoch Place came to the Walnut Grove Schoolhouse to help the people determine if they were ready to start a church, he says, “Having more knowledge of the past history of a smal, but good band of christians in that place under the care of the late Elder Edward Blasdell, of Lebanon, M.E. than other members of the council I made a warm speech, in favor of the reasonable request before us.” [xxv]

Elder Edward Blaisdell was one of several Blaisdell family members who preached in Lebanon and in Rochester.   Edward’s brother, David, was also well known throughout the area for his preaching. They often spoke in Rochester at the Court House and at the church in Gonic. [xxvi] Quarterly meetings were sometimes held in Lebanon and it is likely that Walnut Grove people went across the river to attend these conferences.

At least five first members of Walnut Grove church had married someone from Lebanon.

Two founding members of the church were Samuel Meserve and his wife, Mary Adeline Hanson.  Mary was a daughter of John Hanson of the Pilgrim’s Inn.  The Meserves hosted a picnic in a grove of trees on their farm that they called Walnut Grove Farm.  At this picnic a young woman, Alsada Pray, spoke and encouraged the people to start a Sabbath School in their neighborhood.  After Alsada’s convicting visit to the neighborhood picnic in the Meserve’s Walnut Grove, a Sabbath School was organized in May of 1861.[xxvii]

Another influence on the people was very likely The Morning Star.  This was a widely read newspaper that was published in Dover.  Rev. Enoch Place was active on the board of directors for this newspaper.  The newspaper contained sermons, religious articles, articles on temperance, and was anti- slavery.  It is known that people in the neighborhood shared these views and some belonged to temperance societies and attended abolition meetings.  The early Walnut Grove Church records make mention of sending items to The Morning Star.

This was also the time the Civil War began. In his journal in April and May of that same year, Enoch Place relates his thoughts on what is happening in his country. On Mon. April 15, 1861, he writes “The Startling news flies over the nation like lightning, that Fort Sumpter, near Charleston, South Carolina, is in the hands of the rebels. That Major Anderson and his little band are prisoners of war!!  As the cecessionist, are determined to have war- in my humble opinion, they have commenced in the right place, at the right time, and with the right man to raise the spirits of all the Union men in this great nation. [xxviii]

Enoch was correct in his assessment of the situation.  Immediately, young Union men signed up to join the effort.  Two of these men were Jacob C. Meserve and George H. Meserve, sons from the Walnut Grove Farm.

 

Only two weeks later on Sunday, April 28, Enoch says, “The startling war news, has produced the greatest excitement ever known in this nation since the dark days of the revolution.  Our young men are leaving for inlistment at Dover, to join our armey for the defence of the national Capital at Washington.”

In Strafford on the following Sunday, he relates, “…As two of our young brethren were present, who have inlisted in the regular armey, and leave us tomorrow morning, I made an appeal to the church and congregation in their behalf … O how soon dry eyes turned to wet ones, and a thrill was manifest in many hearts.When I came through  the learge entry, tears were flowing like Showers of rain the young people were shaking hands, and taking leave of those who were about to leave as before named.  Sobs and groans could not be suppressed.  This is only a drop in the bucket, compared with the sorrows, Sufferings, partings, &c. that war brings on a once happy nation.” [xxix]

It is certain that the people in Walnut Grove were having similar feelings.  Just about every other house in the neighborhood sent someone off to war.    It was during this time that the Sabbath School first met in the schoolhouse.

In July of 1863, the neighborhood was saddened by the deaths of little James Wingate, age five, and his sister, Clara, age 8, the only children of members, Samuel N. Wingate and his wife, Francis.  In October of this year, another neighborhood child, Albert Tebbets, died.  That fall and into the winter, it is recorded that the people became more concerned about matters of salvation.

In February of that winter, the Walnut Grove Ladies Benevolent Association was formed.   Twenty – eight neighborhood people joined.  At each meeting of this group, an editress was chosen. Her job was to prepare a paper of a moral and religious nature that would be instructive to read to the group at the next meeting. The ladies were the officers and ran the group, but the gentlemen were also members and often made appropriate remarks after the ladies had presented the dialogues and recitations, and the paper of the evening.  Members joined by paying ten cents.   The ladies did knitting, quilting and sewing projects to help the needy and for auctioning to raise money for the church. The women were the ones who raised the funds for such things as paint, stoves, lighting, carpeting, and other supplies for the church building.

Since Rochester women were very involved in sewing for the war effort at this time, it is likely that the Walnut Grove ladies also were making shirts and knitting stockings for the soldiers. Usually the women met and sewed in the afternoon.  Often a meal was prepared for when the men joined them in the evening.

On May 1, 1864, there was a meeting of divine worship in the schoolhouse.  The Freewill Baptist covenant was read and accepted by the people.  Following this meeting, the people walked to the Salmon Falls River where fourteen of them were baptized by immersion. [xxx]

On June 28, 1864, the Rev. Enoch Place came to the schoolhouse.  With him were Rev. H. Brown, and Rev. Ezekiel True (who would later help start the church named for him, True Memorial Freewill Baptist Church).

In his journal Enoch wrote, “We then went three full miles [from East Rochester] toward Great Falls, to attend to the request of the Walnut Grove Sabbath School association, in a rich farming neighborhood.”[xxxi]  The following day, June 29, 1864, they met with the people in the neighborhood who wanted to start a church.  Rev. Place said he knew many of the people from their Lebanon connection and made a speech in their behalf.

The group was organized and took the name of Walnut Grove.  The church became the second Freewill Baptist church in Rochester with the Gonic church being the first, so the church was sometimes referred to in town records as the Second Baptist church.

At the end of this busy day, Enoch Place wrote of his feelings toward the Walnut Grove people when he said,” “May God bless and prosper these whole souled liberal Christians. Left my good boarding place at Bro. Mills and went to Rochester village.”  Bro. Benjamin Mills lived in the home just north of the present church.  [xxxii]

Samuel R. Hanson recorded the members of the Walnut Grove Church on August 6, 1864 as : [xxxiii]      From these names it is interesting to note that most are descendants of the first settlers of the neighborhood in the 1700’s – the Hansons, Wingates, Allens, Tebbets, and Roberts.  The neighborhood was a group of people whose families had known each other for several generations.  Many of these first members were related to each other by blood or marriage, and must have felt a close kinship from several generations of living as neighbors.

 

At first a church building was planned to be built in the area of Sullivan Farm Drive today.  Soon  a new plan was made and a piece of land was given by Wesley Mills and his father, Benjamin, for the church. This piece was the site used.  At the time the land was only the plot where the church sits. It was just big enough to hold the church building and the carriage sheds behind it.  It did not include the present parking lot area which was given to the church by Verne and Mary Fowler in the 1990’s.

In 1867, families pledged either money, materials, or labor  in amounts ranging from $10 – $100  “for the purpose of erecting a Meeting House in School District No. 1 in Rochester.  An early record states, “ Up to 1867 we had worshipped in the School house then the Church and Society decided to build a house of worship and one was built 24×36 ft. containing 18 pews at a cost of 15.00” [$1,500]. [xxxiv]

Support of the church was through subscription, a pledge made to pay a certain amount quarterly.  The society would be run entirely on voluntary subscriptions and contributions.  The only exception was that pew holders could be assessed for repairs and improvements.  [xxxv] The bylaws also stated that there would be an annual meeting of the society on the first Saturday in January with proper notice posted on the church door ahead of time.

On February 27, 1868, the new building was dedicated in a service attended by several local pastors. The pews were sold at public auction to the highest bidder with the purchaser given a certificate of ownership. [xxxvi]The following record shows the purchasers of the pews:

 

Regarding this whole time of building the church, Ellen Hanson wrote a note that states, “I well remember that the work went on harmoniously.”

No doubt the building of the church was aided by the monies from the parish fund that was still in existence in the town of Rochester.  From the parish tax portion Walnut Grove received $4.30 in 1868.  The following year the town decided to do away with this now outdated system, and they distributed all the remaining money in the parsonage fund to the churches in the town.  Walnut Grove received $102 as its share. [xxxvii]

The building was quite full right from the beginning.  It is likely that the builders could not afford extra space, and also that they never considered a larger building than what they presently needed.  The church was for the families of the neighborhood and they did not anticipate that their farms would one day be sold and divided into smaller house lots, or that people would drive miles in cars to go to church.  They would have felt that rather than a larger church, it would be better to build another church in the next population center.

It had long been a Baptist belief to have small churches as they felt,  “the members of everie Church or Congregation ought to knowe one another, that so they may perform all the duties off love one toward another.”[xxxviii]

There were 18 benches or pews at first. .  The pews were numbered to show ownership.  The pews were originally green, the color favored in many meetinghouses in the 1800’s.  In some churches the pew holders supplied their own pew cushions.  It is not known if the original holders did this, but there have been cushions for many years.

Records mentioning the pews indicate that the pulpit (or desk as it was then called) was originally in the middle of the front with two shorter pews on each side in the front facing the pulpit and two rows of 7 pews down each side facing front. Later one short pew was removed to the left-hand side of the pulpit and one short pew on the right totally removed reducing the number to the current 17.  This was done to make room for an organ.

The pew holders made or supplied their own footstools if they wanted one.  Some of the footstools still have the number of the pew they went with visible in pencil on the bottom.  The footstools were for the comfort of the pew holder to keep their feet a little off the cold floor.

Work on the steeple in 2006, revealed what appeared to be a place for a bell in the older section.  This substantiated a recollection from an older member in the 1960’s that there had been a bell and that it had disappeared from the woodshed along with the kerosene chandelier. These items had been stored in the woodshed after their use had been discontinued.

 

 

While the church has been operating continuously since its founding, records until the 1930’s  show that church was not held every week.  Sometimes, especially in the first years, there was difficulty in finding a minister as many churches still did not have a settled minister. Until the 1990’s the church shared a minister, most of the time with True Memorial or East Rochester.  Sometimes it was difficult for the minister to make it out to the country church on muddy roads.  The members of churches also often did not go out if the weather was bad.  Records show that church was not held in snow storms or if it was very cold or rainy.  It was uncomfortable and believed to be unhealthy to be in wet clothes for people who got to church by walking or riding in an open carriage.

It is likely that the church bell was used to let people know if there was church on some of these days.  Churches at that time used the bell to tell of services and for other reasons such as to announce births and deaths or to call people together for a fire or other problem such as organizing a search party.  This was probably done in Walnut Grove until late in the 1800’s when people began to have telephones.  One of the repair times in the 1890’s probably was when the bell was removed and more decorative elements added to the steeple.

Church was held at 3:00 in the afternoon until the 1970’s.  This gave the minister time to make it out to the church from town and also gave the people who were operating large dairy farms a chance to tend to the animals.

The church was closed every year for vacation for the month of August until into the 1950’s.  During vacation time, the shutters were closed. Many rural churches in the past were not open year round.  Some closed for the summer or some closed for the winter.

If one were to tell the history of the beginnings of most early churches there would be many similarities to Walnut Grove.  Many churches began in a home with people who wished for a revival of their faith.  They were inspired by itinerant speakers and by events such as war or widespread illness.  The people were mostly neighbors and often they were also relatives.  They wanted a central meeting place to share their faith and carry out the works they saw as their duty.

At first the people were mostly white and Protestant.  Later other groups would come into Rochester bringing their faith and culture to start their own neighborhood church.  Many of these early churches still are carrying out their missions in Rochester today; and they have been joined by other newer churches in the 1900’s and early 2000’s.

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

Buzzel, J. (1827). Life of Elder Benjamin Randall: Principally taken from documents written by himself. Hobbs, Woodman and Co. http://www.chigospelcom.net.

Hanson, S. R. (n.d.). Records of the Freewill Baptist Society, 1868-1896.

Hanson, S. R. (n.d.). Records of Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association 1864-1916.

Mc Duffee, F. (1892). The History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, Volume II. John Clark, Printers.

McBeth, H. L. (1987). The Baptist Heritage, 4 Centuries of Baptist Witness. Broadman Press.

McDuffee, F. (1892). History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire, Volume I. The John C lark Co. Printers.

wentworth, William Edcar (1998). Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849 . Boston: transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth (The New England Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists.

Wentworth, William Edgar 1998). Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1849-1868 . ( transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth Boston: The New England Historic and Genealogical Society and THe New Hampshire Society of Genealogists.

Sargent, L. (2004). The History of Walnut Grove. Rochester Historical Society.

Sargent, L. (2006). The People of Walnut Grove. The Rochester Historical Society.

(rpt. 1988). The Baptist Encyclopedia, 1881. http://www.geocities/baptists-documents.

Watson, N. T. (1838). The Life, Experience and Travels of John Colby, written by himself. Lowell, Mass.: http://www.baptistlibraryonline.com.

Williams, R. H. (1976). Sesquicentennial American Baptist Churches in New Hampshire 1826-1976.

  1. baptist history.org. (n.d.).

 

 

 

 

[i]  McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp 31-50

 

[ii] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p75

 

iii McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892)

[iv]  McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp76-79

 

[v] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp83-87

 

[vi] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp83-87

 

[vii] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892)  pp105-114

 

[viii]  McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp105-114

 

[ix] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp105-114

 

[x] Sargent, Linda, The History of Walnut Grove, Rochester Historical Society, 2004

[xi] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p257

 

[xii]  McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p239 p 239

 

[xiii] See George Whitefield @ http://www.Encyclopedia.com and http://www.enWikipedia.org

[xiv] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp239-40

 

[xv] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) pp286-288

 

[xvi] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p288-290

 

 

[xvii]  Colby, John The Life, Experience and Travels of John Colby, written by himself, (N. Thurston & A Watson, 1838, Lowell Mass)  www.baptistlibraryonline.com

[xviii]  Buzzell, John. Life of Elder Benjamin Randal; principally taken from documents written by himself. (Hobbs, Woodman and Co., 1827.) www.chigospelcom.net

[xix]  Place, Enoch  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998).p 682

 

[xx] Place, Enoch  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998).

p 682

 

[xxi] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p278-280

 

[xxii] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998).p 107

 

[xxiii] Place, Enoch  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998).p107

 

[xxiv] Place, Enoch  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume One 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998). p108

 

[xxv] Place, Enoch  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1810-1849transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998). p108

 

[xxvi] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1849-1869transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998). pp1670-71

 

[xxvii] McDuffee, Franklin History of the Town of Rochester New Hampshire,Volume1, (The John Clarke Co., Printers, 1892) p 281

 

[xxviii] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1849-1868transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998). p 1509

 

[xxix] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1849-1868transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998). p 1511

 

[xxx] Hanson, Samuel Runnels, et al Records of the Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association, 1864 – 1916

[xxxi] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1850-1868, transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998) pp 1670-1671

 

 

[xxxii] Wentworth, William Edgar  Journals of Enoch Hayes Place Volume Two 1850-1868, transcribed by William Edgar Wentworth ( The New England Historic Genealogical Society and The New Hampshire Society of Genealogists, Boston 1998) pp 1670-1671

 

[xxxiii] Hanson, Samuel Runnels, et al Records of the Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association, 1864 – 1916

[xxxiv]  Hanson, Samuel Runnels, et al Records of the Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association, 1864 – 1916

[xxxv] Hanson, Samuel Runnels, et al Records of the Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association, 1864 – 1916

[xxxvi] Hanson, Samuel Runnels, et al Records of the Walnut Grove Freewill Baptist Association, 1864 – 1916

[xxxvii] Report of the Town of Rochester 1868, 1869

 

[xxxviii]  Mc Beth, H. Leon, The Baptist Heritage, 4 Centuries of Baptist Witness, ( 1987, Broadman Press)

 

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